The owner of 13 McDonald’s restaurants is accused of violating child labor


The US Department of Labor found 101 child labor violations at 13 McDonald’s restaurants in western Pennsylvania. The restaurants are owned by Santonastasso Enterprises of Bridgeville. The company paid $57,332 in fines, the Labor Department said. The government said the franchise owner allowed 14- and 15-year-old workers to work outside the permitted hours. Offenses include minors: working more than 3 hours a day and after 7:00 pm on school days when the law prohibits working beyond that time. Between June 1st and Labor Day, on days when they can legally work until 9:00 p.m., more than 9:00 p.m. 8 hours on a non-school day, and more than 18 hours per week during a regular school week. Inspectors also found a case of a minor working illegally at a fryer. “It is surprising that they will have so many 14 and 15 hours. -seniors are working under the hourly rate,” said John DuMont, director of the Labor Department’s Wage and Hour Division. One franchise where minors work illegal hours is in Oakland, near Pitt and Carnegie Mellon. Several students who were patrons said they were angry. “Frankly, this is not a good thing. It shouldn’t be happening, especially in this day and age, and there are definitely people out there who can work, so it sounds like a type of exploitation and it’s very important that they stop it,” said CMU student Sherzoy Jan. Another student agreed. “It’s pretty messed up to have a business that uses child labor, but I think because we’re in a university area, there’s a lot of people who are going to be sensitive and a lot of people are looking. for part-time work,” CMU student Tioluwani Ajani said. DuMont said. Parents should consider employers looking to take advantage of children during the holidays. “Right now, around the holiday season is where we’re more apt to see. “These violations with employers trying to fill minor employment gaps,” he said. A statement from franchise owners John and Kathleen Santonastasso read: “We take our role as a local employer very seriously and regret any scheduling issues. that may have happened in our restaurants. Our highest priority is always the safety and well-being of our employees, and we have since implemented a number of new and improved processes and procedures to ensure that employees are appropriately scheduled.”

The US Department of Labor found 101 child labor violations in 13 McDonald’s restaurants located in western Pennsylvania.

The restaurants are owned by Santonastasso Enterprises of Bridgeville. The Labor Department said the company paid $57,332 in fines.

The government said the franchise owner allowed 14- and 15-year-old workers to work outside the permitted hours. Violations include minors:

  • More than 3 hours a day and after 7 pm on school days when the law prohibits working after that time.
  • Between June 1st and Labor Day, later than 9:00 p.m. on days that can legally work until 9:00 p.m.
  • More than 8 hours on a non-school day and more than 18 hours per week on a regular school week.

Inspectors also found an incident where a minor was illegally operating a fryer.

“It’s surprising that they have so many 14- and 15-year-olds working substandard hours,” said John DuMont, the Labor Department’s Wage and Hour Director.

One franchise where minors work illegal hours is in Oakland, near Pitt and Carnegie Mellon. Several students who were patrons said they were angry.

“Obviously, this is not a good thing. It shouldn’t be happening, especially in this day and age, and there are definitely people out there who can work, so it sounds like a type of exploitation, and it’s very important that they stop it,” said CMU student Sherzoy Jan.

Another student agreed.

“It’s pretty confusing to have a business that uses child labor, but I think because we’re in a university area, there’s a lot of people who are going to be sensitive, and there’s a lot of people who are looking for part-time work,” said CMU student Tioluwani Ajani.

DuMont said parents should watch out for employers who want to take advantage of children during the holidays.

“Right now, around the holiday season, is where we tend to see more of these violations, where employers try to hire minors to fill employment gaps,” he said.

A statement from franchise owners John and Kathleen Santonastasso said:

“We take our role as a local employer very seriously and regret any scheduling issues that may occur at our restaurants. Our highest priority is always the safety and well-being of our employees, and we have since implemented a number of new and improved processes and procedures to ensure that employees are appropriately scheduled.”



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